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is a live look at tahrir square. group of hard-core demonstrators vowing to stay until until mohammed morsi invokes a decree granting himself absolute power. this is how bad the violence got. thousands clashing with police and morsi supporters and new pressure on the president to back down and fear that violence will flare up. steve? >> reporter: the number of those tents put up by protestors has grown. they are intent to stay there throughout the week but the number of protestors on the street has declined dramatically over the last 24 hours. on late friday there were up to 40,000 people on the square. the protests did turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be
with the lathes decree from hamid morsi. morsi giving himself almost ax slut power dosuspending judicia review of any decision he makes bringing instability to the fragile middle east. welcome to america's news headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian st
grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
weekend. is egypt headed for a muslim brother take over. that is the fears of morsi crashing in streets of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at
for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it continues to grow, this could put much more pressure on the egyptian president and we're looking at tahrir squ
in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, morsi vowed he would not back down. >> i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone. to go against a
president morsi granted himself unchecked powers and sent thousands of protesters back into the streets, people who had been helping to topple mubarak, now against the man they call the new egypt egyptian pharaoh. what are the chances we're headed for a new islamist coo in egypt? >> it could be headed that way. you could also be headed back to a military takeover. if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there's continued chaos. i'll never forget after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square. a young woman said it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that's what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
mohamud morsi is overseeing the talks and he has become the central figure in the delicate negotiations. morsi was at his sister's funeral today but he did issue a statement saying israeli aggression would end today. tuesday. at the end of the day the two sides still had not reached agreement. a hamas official told reuters they had come close but the talks "must wait until tomorrow." now this is morsi's real debut on the world stage. he rose from his position as head of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. but analysts say that he's not really a true religious fundamentalist. that he had to adopt those positions to fend off competition from islamist extremists. and his background does seem t
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
, christians, youth groups and women's rights groups. some have sued to dissolve the panel. morsy's decree for bids that. as nightfall approached, anger turned to violence similar to the egyptian revolution protesters clashing with police. we're along one of the major arteries leading into tahrir square. clashes between security forces and protesters, tear gas. and we're moving away. as the protests intensified, mr. morsy appealed for calm. in a speech hundreds of his supporters who gathered outside the presidential palace in cairo, he defended his decrees and rejected accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear path, a path that achieves a clear goal. >> reporter: throughout the early morning hours, there were pockets of clashes and the injuries continue to pile-up and many demonstrators pitched tents in the square, an indication that these demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >> rez rez sesayia in cairo. >> sad news from the world of entertainment. larry hagman has died.
didn't warn you. violence erupts in egypt after president morsi grants himself unmitigated power? what does this mean for america and its allies? and we'll ask did president obama hand morsi a victory? [ male announcer ] red lobster's hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and in
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
this cease-fire possible. called egyptian president mahmoud morsi, and benjamin netanyahu. president obama reiterated the united states believes israel has the right to defend itself. also said the united states would take this moment to work towards helping israel to further secure the region. but also talked about the importance of trying to achieve a broader security agreement in the region. and in speaking to egyptian president mahmoud morsi, president obama really thanked him for playing such a pivotal role. the white house saying that is one of the big things that came out of the past several days, alex. that president obama and egyptian president mahmoud morsi spent a lot of time talking on the phone. by some accounts they had six conversations in several details. and through those conversations, president obama and president morsi really strengthened their relationship. there was a question surrounding president morsi in part because of his ties to the muslim brotherhood, and feld morsi was pragmatic and they were on the same page in wanting to broker a cease-fire. that could have
against morsi raided an office, and in cairo security forces fired tear gas at thousands of protesters. 100 people reportedly were injured. critics say president morsi is making himself a dictator. he claims he granded himself the new powers so figures from the former regime cannot block progress. steve, what is the scene like right now? >> you can hear a lot of it now, and as the day has gone on and tonight the protests have become more violent. a fire is burning before protesters set a flame to a monument, and there are battles between security forces and younger protesters throwing glass bottles filled with gasoline and police are firing ban tear gas. the test is tomorrow after 40,000 protests come out. it will be a long-term fight of the people against the president , anger and bitterness against the egyptian president saying any decree he issues is legal and there is no appeal to the decree putting himself above the law and the courts and tens of thousands in cairo not happy about that move by the democratically elected president. >>gregg: does this move from president morsi catch
that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who played the villain, the world couldn't help loving. i'm harris faulkener well, begin with egypt on edge and turmoil and violence spreading and response to a colossal power grab. by egypt's islamist president, mohamed morsi. though country's rocky transition to democracy may hit a brick wall, two days of viol
mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator f
square, but protesters insisted they will not latest site until president morsi withdraws the sweeping decree he issued last week. it gives him broad new powers, free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted
and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
to netanyahu, talk to president morsi of egypt. and he recognizes something that almost every president eventually discovers which is that america is still indispensable player when it comes to these sort of conflicts in the middle east. pete: still the indispensable player and hasn't changed with the arab spring? >> the arab spring hasn't changed that and you've seen the revolution of the arab spring and our relationship to it particularly in this relationship, this new partnership between president obama and president morsi of egypt. very interesting history. president morsi from the muslim brotherhood just a few weeks back before the election, the americans and the obama administration very upset at morsi for not doing more to protect the embassy in cairo during some of those protests there. this week, you saw this sort of new partnership developing and they were on the phone repeatedly. 11:30 at night. 2:30 in the morning from air force one. morsi was a key as far as he could see to solving this problem. he was investing a lot of his own capital with president obama was in this new
president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the protest both in favor of and against that country's president. we'll keep an eye on it "happening now." also this fox news alert, holiday shoppers nationwide out in droves to take advantage of black friday tk
minister, secretary clinton praised egyptian president, and muslim brotherhood member morsi for brokering the mosque. that is considered a terrorist organization by the u.s. government, of course. >> i want to thank president morsi for his leadership in ending the violent, this is a critical moment for the region. egypt a new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stabilitiy it peace. lou: the ceasefire hours after a bomb tow through a bus in israel's defense ministry in tel aviv, it injured at least 2 dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take out right responsibility. a damascus based group with ties to the west bank took credit. the israeli government confirmed this is only the first stage of a ceasefire agreement work many questions remain stock answered. a second set of negotiations reportedly to begin within the next 24 hours, israel's blockade of the gaza border, and an end to the flow of arms in to gaza to be negotiated. but perhaps, a bigger question, did secretary of state, hillary c
override any decision that has been made by morsi and that will be made by morsi. in a way, he is trying to create an imperial rpresidency, an imperial presidency that basically anoints morsi as the supreme lead over egypt, period. he monstrously miscalculated. he has thrown egypt into a political and constitutional crisis. he has finally succeeded in unifying the fractured opposition. now not just the liberals and the nationalists and the leftists. millions of egyptians are outraged in morsi addressing his own office of absolute authority. >> that's the question i have though. this has sparked massive protests as we can see. he is now -- you know, he's standing his ground but he also seems to be giving a little ground. is there cause in your view, maybe from our viewpoint, western standpoint, to take a step back and let this play out a little bit before cle clairing egypt's great democracy is over. is there a chance that by the owned the day there will be a resolution and could maybe strengthen democracy? >> i have no doubt in my mind that this is an egyptian crisis. egyptians must take
. >>> he was the man of the hour, egypt's first democratically elected president. now morsi is being called aa would-be dictator and people are protesting. some are getting killed. massive crowds today at funeral of a protestor who died overnight fatally injured during demonstrations last week against morsi putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it the streets looked like this when millions rose to overthrow "the dictator" hosni mubarak. this it time they accuse him of a naked power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body and emerged saying it his edict was clarified. it remaining unclear. we have the late heest from cairo. this clarification as morsi's advisers call it, it is just a clarification or is morsi faced with protests we've been seeing trying to save face while actually scaling back his decree? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've spoken to the president's office throughout the day, and they say their position is clear that they are not not scaling back on these decrees or making any concessions. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing
erupting in egypt after president muhammad morsi grants himself new and far-reaching powers. live pictures as the president speaking right now. that's muhammad morsi, as hundreds of egyptians are protesting in tahrir square today. morsi's opponents clashing with supporters in cities all over egypt. we're now hearing protesters storming the office of the muslim brotherhood and throwing out books and chairs and other things onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the ne
. >> reporter: for a fourth straight night, protesters attacked the office of morsi's freedom party. demonstrators are angry at morsi's decision that is leaning the country to a dictatorship. >> a country of institution. not symbolize in one person. >> reporter: morsi's decree gives him more powers. morsi's decisions are beyond challenges and he also dismissed the attorney general. now the attorney general backed by the country's powerful judges, many of whom were appointed by hosni mubarak are fighting back. they are calling for a strike? the courtrooms. morsi and others have blamed the judiciary for blocking key reforms and annuling the party. mainly islam report. on tuesday, tens of thousands of supporters of the president are expected to hold competing rallies a few miles apart from each other. without a solution, the streets of egypt may not be calm. reporting for nbc, cairo. >>> meanwhile, back in the states, lawmakers on capitol hill say they are working hard and fast to avoid the fiscal cliff. if a deal is not met by the end of next month, tax increases and spending cuts wil
attention to overseas. it was less than a week ago you may recall the president of egypt, president morsy, was hailed as a hero for helping to broker that cease-fire between israel and hamas. well, days later he surprised just about everybody by awarding himself sweeping new powers back home in egypt. that triggered a wave of violence in the streets. it brought crowds and protesters back to the familiar confines of tahrir square. tonight, the president of egypt is embarking on a campaign of damage control. our report from nbc's ayman mohyeldin in cairo. >> reporter: a day of mourning across egypt, in cairo, thousands paid respects to a protester killed by police. and in alexandria, a funeral for the member of the muslim brotherhood, just fifteen years old. both were victims of the riots that broke out after president morsy gave himself sweeping new powers. it ignited a wave of protests among them, and loyal supporters fighting in the streets. the muslim brotherhood were to blame, we elected them, thought they would lift us up, but they threw us to the ground. i will never vote for them ag
with a deal. we have the details on that ahead. and the egyptian president morsi. wow. violent protests after he essentially made himself a dictator. today he said he is not backing down. so, where is he with the israel and palestinian thing? worried about your teen's driving habits? now you can hire an off-duty cop to spy on them. but is that legal? that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, you will be glad to know your congress is back from break and so begins another round of negotiations aimed at keeping the country from going off the so-called fiscal cliff. president obama expressing optimism they can come up with a deal to prevent automatic spending cuts and expiring tax breaks just into fox, the white house spokesman, jake carney, reports president obama spoke with the house speaker boehner and the senate majority leader harry reid over the weekend. still, concerns of the crisis and the european debt crisis sent stocks down but not precipitously but down. we are seeing signs of progress in washington, dc, wit
to president morsi. what's more disturbing i think in many ways that hamas got credibility, they didn't deserve as a result of all of this, and i believe morsi was elevated by the white house and by secretary clinton, and i think the end result is that the only reason there's a cease-fire is because their missiles weren't effective, because the israelis were able to prevent they mean. them. i'm afraid they'll go back to the drug board and get bigger missiles that are more effective. what do you think? >> you're right. if you look at the wording of the cease-fire, it's pretty ridiculous. you've got the muslim brotherhood president as the arbiter of the israelis and hamas. don't forget the muslim brotherhood and hamas are the same organization. secondly, you have an administration, at least 2,000 people in the streets of cairo, saying we do not support this power grab. you've got the muslim brotherhood president who clearly does not believe in or support anything that has to do with american interests. the white house is essentially been silent on it. you know, it really reminds me of their silen
president. i'm rick folbalm. >> heather: and i'm heather childers. accusing morsi of an unprecedented attack on the judiciary. and this is after last year's revolution and they continued to stage rallies across the country, sparking new fears on the instability in an already volatile part of the world. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo, egypt. steve? >> heather, there's a showdown between egypt' new president, morsi and the chief judges throughout the country say they will not go back to work as long as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria and police cars set on fire and other fires set as well. the next move in the battle will shape up to be tuesday when supporters of the president plan a march and also protesters, people who feel this president is tr
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporte
on the streets of cairo. the violence flaired last week when president morsi declared himself immune from the courts. so far one person has died and hundreds have been injured. >>> egypt's stock market plunged today and the first day since president morsi made his decree. today protesters are occupying tehrere square hoping to denounce the first president who made history. >> reporter: thousands of egyptians set up camp, their sediment making the world know they're there to stay a while. chanting revelation, revelation. >> this is just a beginning because it's over, he's become a dictator. >> reporter: over the last three days there have been violent clashes between anti morsi protesters and the police. both are planning big marshes on tuesday. this after he gave himself almost unchecked powers even over the courts. protesters have called on judges to go on strike. in washington the word of the day is leverage as a growing concert urges president obama to use u.s. dollars. >> our leverage obviously is not only the substantial aid we provide plus debt forgiveness plus an imf deal but also
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
egyptian president morsi for his role in brokering the cease-fire. the morrissey -- morsi government acts as a go teen for hamas which the u.n. does not negotiate. secretary of state, hillary clinton emergency peacemaking mission was after a week fighting that killed 180 palestinians and five israelis. the chief correspondent, jonathan hunt sex like at the united nations. secretary clinton made the point this is really just one step in a long process. >>jonathan: bringing a halt to the firing of rockets by hamas and by israel is obviously a crucial step but it is just a step and very much the first step. what we have seen today is an agreement for a quite literal ceasing of fire, none of the underlying issues has yet been tackled as hillary clinton made clear today in her comments. listen. >> the united states will work with partners to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >>jonathan: on the part of the palestinians, what they want is lifting of the economic blockade on gaza, the israels have indicated they will a
has a complicated relationship with. egyptian president mohammed morsi and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. the president getting netanyahu to agree to the tentative cease-fire with the carrot of additional u.s. funding for iron dome and other missile defense progra programs. >> i have agreed we will fight weapons of terror. >> u.s. and israel knows they send the rockets to hamas through egypt, which is why the president is using more of a stick in the conversation with morsi. today, hillary clinton praising and pushing morsi, member of the muslim brothe brotherhood. >> this is a critical new moment. they are assuming the responsibility of the leadership that made the country corner stone of the regional stability and peace. >> israeli officials are blunter. pressuring morsi to finally stop the spread of the deadliest rockets that are raining down. >> responsibility there to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructive in the past. has had a constructive role. we hope egypt will continue to fulfill a constructive role now and in the future. >>
for power by mohammed morsi. many saying he's acting like a modern day pharaoh. a big republican turns his back on the grover norquist tax pledge. is the gop preparing to give in to the president? is and thousands of people packing into stores today. watch your wallet. we'll tell you how the shopping season is really adding up. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm tom foreman. egypt erupts. thousands of angry egyptians have been protesting in opposition to a controversial power grabby egypt's president. at least 80 people have been injured and one killed in clashes with police who fired tear gas into the crowds. the unrest began after he issued a series of orders which allow him to run the country unchecked until a new constitution is written. morsi says his actions are meant to speed up reform and achieve political and social stability. >> translator: i have said beforened i repeat again, that i would never use a legislation against individuals, parties, men, women or muslims or christians for personal gains and to settle scores. >> now, this is all very problematic for the white ho
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